Mallow [Common]


I can’t say what it is about weeds that l have always loved? Perhaps it is quite simply because they are misunderstood like some animal species. Whatever your opinion or view is on weeds, they are everywhere, and they are here to stay.

Twenty-five years ago, l used to forage for weeds to feed the enormous number of rabbits l had in my commercial breeding operation. Knowing about them made everything easier because it meant that l wouldn’t accidentally kill an animal by feeding the wrong weed.


Most weeds are harmless, not all. Of course, some are and can be deadly. The fact is that people don’t like weeds because they don’t belong where they usually appear or are out of place. Many a time, gardeners especially don’t want them because weeds tend to grow quicker and easier than many ornamental flowers.

Weeds have a way of surviving. They are ONLY considered weeds on the domestic level because, let’s be honest, when we are out walking in the countryside, how many people are bothered by the presence of weeds then?

There are advantages and disadvantages to having weeds in your gardens and yards. They do have a lot of benefits that many people tend to ignore, and this series will highlight that.
The Beauty of Weeds

Companion Plantings
Shelter
Encouraging wildlife
Fertilising and enriching the soils
Providing and active Mulch/Soil protection
Attracting pollinators and good insects
Repelling pests
Food source for animals and humans
Serves as decoy crops
Great for wildlifing the garden
Soil conditioning

[Common] Mallow

Malva sylvestris

“Love is like wildflowers; It’s often found in the most unlikely places.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson


Images by Pixabay


I have had Mallow growing in my garden before, although my current garden has none. It surrounds us here in the countryside, a beautiful flower, yet still a weed, a countryside weed or a woodland wildflower pending personal interpretation.

They are, in fact, a lovely addition to many wildlife gardens. Mallow is superb for pollinators and can be quickly grown in your gardens too. Bumblebees, honey bees, solitary bees, and many other pollinators love Mallow. It is easy to plant and easy to manage – however, as said, some can see it as very invasive, so be mindful.

In some countries, Mallow is seen as an aggressive and invasive weed. It can attain heights of between three and a half to eight feet tall and with a width of around 30 inches. Mallow has very long taproots.

In ancient times, this was grown as a herb, and in truth, you can still buy this from specialist seed sellers.

The plant is edible – flowers and leaves alike, with the latter being great as a lettuce type leaf. You can even chew on the root to aid dental hygiene!

It has medicinal properties, you can dry the leaves, and yes, you can also make it into a Tea. It can be used in the beauty side of life as well. It has a lot of uses, combined with the fact that the flower is pretty.

In French, the word mallow translates to Mauve.

I hope you enjoyed M is for Mallow [Common], and I’ll see you again soon.

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Published by The Autistic Composter

Howdy Folks, Earthly Comforts is a broad niche wildlife journaling scrapbook focusing on the countryside, wildlife biodiversity and environmental conservation, flora and fauna volunteering projects, gardening, composting and vermiculture, also known as ‘worm farming and photography too.

15 thoughts on “Mallow [Common]

      1. Yes, all are well here, thank you. Hope you and Suze have recovered from your last bout of hard labor and are feeling well and perky. 😊 Wishing you a Merry Christmas! Are you going to do anything special over the holidays?

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Hey Betty, thank you 🙂 Always backatcha too 🙂

        Special, not really.

        Suze is working tomorrow norning, then we are going to do some of the gardening job in the butchery garden. Sunday Suze is with her cousin and l will be home.

        Monday providing the weather stays dry, we will be down at the allotment adding soil depth to the raised beds.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. It has been really cold here. Saturday the low was 07 degrees F and Sunday, 17 degrees F. I hovered over the heater all day. 😊 But, thank goodness, it was a beautiful, sunny day.

        Liked by 1 person

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