Clover


I can’t say what it is about weeds that l have always loved? Perhaps it is quite simply because they are misunderstood like some animal species. Whatever your opinion or view is on weeds, they are everywhere, and they are here to stay.

Twenty-five years ago, l used to forage for weeds to feed the enormous number of rabbits l had in my commercial breeding operation. Knowing about them made everything easier because it meant that l wouldn’t accidentally kill an animal by feeding the wrong weed.


Most weeds are harmless, not all. Of course, some are and can be deadly. The fact is that people don’t like weeds because they don’t belong where they usually appear or are out of place. Many a time, gardeners especially don’t want them because weeds tend to grow quicker and easier than many ornamental flowers.

Weeds have a way of surviving. They are ONLY considered weeds on the domestic level because, let’s be honest, when we are out walking in the countryside, how many people are bothered by the presence of weeds then?

There are advantages and disadvantages to having weeds in your gardens and yards. They do have a lot of benefits that many people tend to ignore, and this series will highlight that.
The Beauty of Weeds

Companion Plantings
Shelter
Encouraging wildlife
Fertilising and enriching the soils
Providing and active Mulch/Soil protection
Attracting pollinators and good insects
Repelling pests
Food source for animals and humans
Serves as decoy crops
Great for wildlifing the garden
Soil conditioning

Clover

Trifolium

“Wildflowers aren’t meant to be cut & tamed. They’re meant to be loved & admired.

Anthony T. Hincks


Clover is also known as Trefoil.



This little beauty can be in salads raw, or you can sauté them. The flowers can make tea if dried or decoratives in puddings and desserts, and they can be used to form part of your lawn, as they are soft underfoot, and the bees love them too.

Just be aware that clover is quite invasive.

You can grow some clover before turning your raised beds in for the winter months and digging into the soil and covered. Clover also provides nitrogen to the ground and is great as a replacement fertilizer, so there is no need for artificial fertilizers with clover growing. The growing of clovers can also help to reduce soil compaction.

There is another beauty to clover, and that is it can act as a form of ‘Living Mulch‘ which can prove beneficial to some gardeners as a way of reducing weed growth.

Savvy gardeners could easily incorporate clovers to work as a pathway between their crop lines if carefully considered into the gardening layout.
Check out Plant Profile


I hope you enjoyed C for Clover, and I’ll see you again soon.

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Published by The Autistic Composter

Howdy Folks, Earthly Comforts is a broad niche wildlife journaling scrapbook focusing on the countryside, wildlife biodiversity and environmental conservation, flora and fauna volunteering projects, gardening, composting and vermiculture, also known as ‘worm farming and photography too.

19 thoughts on “Clover

  1. Clover is a favorite of mine. “Weeds” are overlooked in the same way every day ‘common sense’ is these days. Hybrid versions of plants (and thought) are terribly overrated at our own peril! 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hey Di, some years clover is seen everywhere and other years hardly anywhere. With people’s need for perfect lawns many try to eradicate it and yet when they do that they also take out the ability for many pollinators to visit their garden. It can be a hard battle to balance for some gardeners.

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      1. If you weren’t adverse it, you could deliberatly plant clover seed with grass seed and the balance would eradicate the bare earth patches 🙂

        White clover is a particularly good ‘grass replacer’ and lawn supporter.

        Liked by 1 person

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